Sunday, June 29, 2008

Nokia Supernova handset line-up launches


Recognizing that no one style fits all, Nokia today unveiled a new range of products to let consumers express their personal styles on a number of levels ranging from stylish designs, to personalization through vibrantly hued exchangeable covers.

The first four devices to launch as part of the new Nokia Supernova range feature a mix of bold colors and of-the-moment designs, evoking the allure of the latest statement handbags or must-have sunglasses. Aimed at style conscious men and women who want to stay connected, the new range delivers exceptional mobile functionality alongside a variety of music and internet experiences.

"As we rely more heavily on mobile phones to stay connected, they increasingly know everything about us and have become a window into our worlds,"

said Jo Harlow, vice president, LIVE category, Nokia.

"With the Supernova range, we set out to give people the ability to set themselves apart in the same way that they would with a traditional statement accessory."

Xpress yourself

The new Nokia 7610, 7510 and 7310 Supernova devices give people an option to truly personalize their look by matching the style of their phone to their ever-changing moods with a choice of exchangeable Xpress-On covers in striking colors and glamorous surfaces.

Nokia 7610 Supernova

Featuring a slide design and smooth curves, the Nokia 7610 Supernova offers Xpress-On covers in a choice of a set of 'steel blue' and 'red' covers offset by a muted gray front surface, or 'bright lilac' and 'steel blue' contrasted against a pristine white front surface. The innovative Theme Colorizer feature lets people identify and capture any color and further tailor a look by applying captured colors to the phone's key illumination and wallpaper.

kuva

Additional features include a 3.2 megapixel camera with dual LED flash and 8x digital zoom, instant messaging and TV out for image sharing. With the Nokia 7610 Supernova, consumers can also enjoy and manage music with a dedicated music key, FM-radio, an MP3 player and access to Nokia Music Store* through the Nokia Music PC Client. The Nokia WidSets service gives access to enjoy and share content on favorite websites through the device.

The Nokia 7610 Supernova is available in the third quarter of 2008 with an estimated retail price of 225 EUR before taxes and subsidies.

Nokia 7510 Supernova

The Nokia 7510 Supernova boasts an iconic fold design with a push-to-open side key. Available with Xpress-On front and back covers in 'storm blue', 'red', 'emerald green' and 'espresso brown' the Nokia 7510 Supernova features magical light effects with a hidden-until-lit display and a reminder light. With outstanding mechanical quality, a soft feel and solid metal hinge, the phone features a 2 megapixel camera with NIPS, LED flash, 4x digital zoom, a 512MB microSD card**, a large 2.2 inch QVGA display and a new user friendly Nokia web browser for easy access to Nokia Search, Share on OVI and Flickr.

kuva

With the Nokia 7510 Supernova, consumers can enjoy and manage music with an FM Radio, an enhanced MP3 player, access to Nokia Music Store and Nokia Music PC Client. Additional features include a link to YouTube, access to Nokia Maps 1.2 to navigate with free mapping, routing and local search, support of A-GPS and the Nokia WidSets service.

The Nokia 7510 Supernova is available in the fourth quarter of 2008 with an estimated retail price of 180 EUR before taxes and subsidies.

Nokia 7310 Supernova

The slim and sleek Nokia 7310 Supernova includes Xpress-On covers etched with daring 3D textured designs available in 'steel blue' plus a second front and back cover in 'wasabi green' or 'candy pink'. A further five front and back cover options will be available for purchase in select markets in 'mushroom silver', 'plum jam', 'electric blue', 'yellow mellow' and 'espresso brown'.

kuva

Additional features include a 2 megapixel camera with 4x digital zoom and TV out for image sharing, instant messaging and playing the preinstalled games on TV. An FM RDS radio and an MP3 music player complete the offering for style conscious individuals that want to enjoy their music anytime, anywhere.

The Nokia 7310 Supernova is available in the second quarter of 2008 with an estimated retail price of 155 EUR before taxes and subsidies.

Nokia 7210 Supernova

For trend watchers who want simplicity with style, the Nokia 7210 Supernova has a chic, slim design and is available in a choice of 'bubble gum pink' and 'vivid blue' in a gloss finish. With the Nokia 7210 Supernova, people can enjoy music sideloaded from a PC or purchased from Nokia Music Store, as well as manage music with the new Nokia Music PC client, which is available for download. With an SD memory card slot, favorite music and videos can be easily played and saved. A 2 megapixel camera and access to Flickr provide one click access to share photos.

kuva

The Nokia 7210 Supernova is available in the third quarter of 2008 with an estimated retail price of 120 EUR before taxes and subsidies.

*) Where available

**) Memory card size may vary by market


Fido Launches Sony Ericsson W380a Flip Phone


Maybe you're not at all interested in paying an arm and a leg for an iPhone 3G. Maybe you don't like touchscreens. Maybe you just like flip phones better. Whatever the case, Fido has alternative for any music phone fans out there.

The Sony Ericsson W380a was just added to the Fido lineup and the flip phone comes with everything that you've come to expect from the Walkman brand. The flip phone naturally comes with an integrated media player, but it also lets you enjoy FM radio on the go as well. Other features include a 1.3 megapixel camera, embedded instant messaging, and mobile web surfing via EDGE. Yes, it's compatible with that $7 unlimited on-device browsing option.

Flip out and pay $60 with a three-year contract for the Sony Ericsson W380a from Fido.

Saturday, June 28, 2008

Adobe Releases Acrobat 9 in 3 Flavors


Adobe has released the latest version of its document creating software Acrobat for Windows and Mac platforms. Acrobat 9 for Windows and Mac includes support for not only Adobe Flash technology but can also embed multimedia files compatible with Adobe Flash Player to create rich PDF documents.

Acrobat 9 thus helps PDF portfolio creation through its ability to unify myriad multimedia content ranging from audio tracks to 3D models to customizable documents. By synchronizing Acrobat 9 with the recently launched www.acrobat.com public Beta, live collaboration within PDF documents is possible.

Acrobat 9 has been launched in three flavors, including Acrobat 9 Standard, Acrobat 9 Pro, and Acrobat 9 Pro Extended (which includes Adobe Presenter software). Pricing of Acrobat 9 is: Standard for $299 or $99 to upgrade; Pro for $449 or $159 to upgrade; and Pro Extended for $699 or $299 to upgrade.


In addition to Acrobat 9 having been released, Adobe is expected to release Adobe Reader 9 next month.

Friday, June 27, 2008

Now Use New & Improved Google Reader


Google Reader is indispensable for Google users who like to keep tabs on Web sites of their choice. To make things even easier for Reader users, Google has now simplified the way feeds are added.

Explaining the functioning of the new and improved Google Reader on its blog, Ionut Alex Chitu said that earlier, users needed to click on "Add subscription" and then either type either the address of the site or enter some keywords. After entering some keywords like [Google blog] or [new scientist], Google Reader would display a list of results mostly obtained using standard Web search.

Here, Google Reader would display the list of Web search results, in the process, filtering Web pages that didn't have feeds. The approach worked well in most cases, except for when search results included pages from Wikipedia or YouTube, sites with irrelevant feeds.


Now when a user enters a navigational query in the 'Add Subscription' box, Google Reader will directly subscribe to the top result. An example cited by Chitu is if you say type [new scientist], Google Reader will automatically subscribe you to New Scientist's feed, but that's not the case when you enter a more general query like say [scientist].

Sony Gives PS3 a Shot of Adrenaline: Movies and a Twirling Globe

Sony's Blu-ray won the battle of high-definition DVD formats, but its PlayStation 3 gaming console has been losing the war over networked home entertainment. That will change this summer, promised Kaz Hirai, president of Sony Computer Entertainment, during a Tokyo press conference announcing new PS3 services for the U.S. market.

Sony will roll out on-demand movies and TV shows for download via the PS3's broadband-enabled PlayStation Network. It will also launch Life With PlayStation, offering news headlines and weather information with a spinning-globe user interface reminiscent of Nintendo's Wii News.

The company will announce pricing and other details, including when the services will become available in Europe and Japan, in July.

Late to the Movie Download Game

Sony has been promising a video download service through its PlayStation 3 since last summer, but has watched as rivals Microsoft and Apple have eclipsed its plans with their own on-demand entertainment download offerings -- Xbox Live Marketplace and Apple TV, respectively.

Xbox 360 and Apple TV owners can now stream HD movies into their living rooms -- even though Sony and the Blu-Ray DVD player built into every PS3 outlasted the now-obsolete HD-DVD format.

"These things are hard to do,"

Michael Gartenberg, vice president and research director at JupiterResearch, told TechNewsWorld.

Sony had promised deals with companies like Real Networks and AOL for its previous generation console, the PlayStation 2, and never delivered, Gartenberg pointed out.

"It's not surprising, and the challenge that each of these companies is going to have is getting out there and working in these new formats before consumers become entrenched in something else. That's why you've got this land grab going on,"

he said, referring to the struggle over dominance of the living room waged by Sony, Microsoft, Apple and, recent entrant Netflix, with its Roku media player.

Sony's Next-Gen Challenge

Sony has lost more than US$3 billion on the PlayStation 3 since its launch, but additional networked services and cost-trimming will bring the PS3 business unit to profitability by March 2009, said Hirai.

"Sony said the things they needed to say,"

Gartenberg remarked.

"What Sony has found in this generation was a Microsoft that was much stronger than it had been the last time around. It came to market a year ahead (with the Xbox 360) and didn't squander that year. At the same time, it's facing a revitalized Nintendo, which was the last thing everybody was expecting. All of this is putting tremendous pressure on Sony."

Nissan 370Z Could Be Offered with Beefy V8 Engine

The assumption was that the upcoming Nissan 370Z would get the same 3.7L V6 engine as its recent Infiniti G37 counterpart. What about people who want a little more grunt to go with their Japanese sports car? Not everyone can afford the asking price of the fantastic Nissan GT-R, so a V8-powered version of the 370Z just could be the ticket.

According to Best Car magazine of Japan, Nissan is planning on selling at least two versions of the Nissan 370Z coupe. The first would likely get the same V6 as the Infiniti, but a high performance version could get outfitted with a V8. Best Car did not mention exactly which eight-cylinder was being considered, but pundits are looking toward the company's 4.5L unit. A bent eight, according to Nissan's Chief of Production, is a distinct possibility.

To provide even more of a performance boost, the new Nissan 370Z will be about 220 pounds lighter than the current model. Buyers will choose between a six-speed manual and a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.

MOTOROKR E8 debuts at T-Mobile USA on July 7

Get ready to transform your mobile experience. The highly anticipated ROKR E8 from Motorola Inc. is set to rock the U.S. with exclusive availability from T-Mobile USA, Inc. beginning July 7, 2008.

Giving consumers the best of both worlds, ROKR E8 is both a talented MP3 player that makes great phone calls and a mobile phone with amazing music capabilities. The first device to feature Motorola's breakthrough ModeShift technology stole the spotlight at the 2008 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), taking home top awards from leading consumer technology media.

Summary of key ROKR E8 features:

ModeShift technology transforms the device from phone to music player with the touch of a button

Innovative haptics technology provides tactile response when a virtual key is pressed

FastScroll navigation wheel allows for scrolling through thousands of songs with the slide of a thumb

Patented CrystalTalk(TM) technology delivers outstanding call clarity even in noisy environments

Windows(TM) Media Player(TM) 11 compatibility enables easy transfer of tunes from the PC to the device(1)

Includes pre-loaded music tracks and album art from Interpol, The Starting Line and The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus

"With ROKR E8, U.S. music lovers no longer have to settle when it comes to using their mobile phone as a music player and vice versa,"

said Jean Pierre Le Cannellier, senior director of North America marketing, Motorola Mobile Devices.

"ROKR E8 is an exciting blend of innovative design and technology that harmonizes music and phone features into a single mobile device."

Motorola designed ROKR E8 to deliver an uncompromised consumer experience for music or talk. Using breakthrough ModeShift technology from Motorola, the quad-band GPRS/EDGE device presents users with only the controls they need, at the time they need them, instantly transforming from music player to phone with the touch of a button.

When powered off, the surface of ROKR E8 is smooth, with no visible keys. Power on the device and it presents a virtual numbered keypad on the front surface. With one "press" of the virtual music key, the phone keypad disappears and control keys for the music player -- play, pause, fast forward and rewind -- appear in its place.

Yet, ROKR E8 is more than just a "touch"-operated device. Using innovative vibrating haptics technology, the device provides the tactile feedback consumers expect from a traditional keypad, providing confirmation they have pressed a virtual key.

ROKR E8 also marks the debut of the new FastScroll navigation wheel from Motorola, a variable-speed touch control that lets consumers easily scroll through all of the content stored on the device. With a gentle slide of the thumb, the wheel quickly scrolls through your music (music mode), contacts (phone mode), calendar (phone mode), or multimedia (imaging mode) content. Information is easily viewed on the landscape 2.0" QVGA display.

In music mode, ROKR E8 delivers great sound through a three-dimensional stereo feature that enhances two-channel audio and an on-board equalizer. Music can be enjoyed on the built-in speaker, with a compatible Bluetooth® enabled stereo headset(2), or through a wired headset plugged into the 3.5mm jack.

ROKR E8 also helps consumers discover new music with a built-in FM radio and support for Song ID(3). The 2GB internal memory can store up to 1,500 songs(4), and the external memory is expandable up to 4GB with an optional microSD card. Music transfers quickly with USB 2.0. The device is compatible with Windows Media Player 11 on the PC, which also provides access to more than 200 online music stores.

In phone mode, ROKR E8 provides outstanding voice quality using Motorola CrystalTalk technology. The powerful device can receive calls while downloading or playing music(1), text messaging(3), surfing the Web(3) or taking pictures so you can constantly stay connected to those that matter most. Quality construction and materials help make ROKR E8 durable and reliable, and a high gloss front, aluminum soft touch back, spun metal side keys and engraved banding offer the modern style expected from Motorola.

Panasonic Unveils Rugged Ultra-Mobile PC

Panasonic on Wednesday introduced a rugged handheld PC that offers field workers the same features as a full-size notebook, but at a much smaller size.

The CF-U1, the first ultra-mobile PC in the Toughbook product line, is 7 inches wide, 6 inches deep, and 2 inches high. The device has a 5.6-inch touch screen that viewable in sunlight and a Qwerty keyboard. The computer is powered by Intel new low-energy Atom processor and comes with 1 GB of memory.


The computer is the result of more than two years of feedback from an array of government and commercial organizations that need a small computer that can withstand the rigors of being out in the field with insurance adjusters, building inspectors, police officers, firefighters, oil and gas employees, and other workers, the company said. The highly portable device includes a 16 GB solid-state drive, which has no moving parts, making it more durable than hard disk drives.

Data capture options include barcode and RFID readers and a 2-megapixel camera. The computer comes with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth wireless connectivity, with 3G support optional. The machine is available with Windows XP or Windows Vista.

The all-weather CF-U1 is fan-less for quieter operation and includes hot-swappable batteries for replacing power supplies without disrupting operation. Approximate battery life is nine hours. The device, which weights 2.3 pounds, has a magnesium alloy chassis that protects against bumps and drops of up to 4 feet.

The Toughbook CF-U1 is scheduled to be available in Panasonic resellers and distributors in August. Pricing starts at $2,499.

Panasonic is one of many vendors offering rugged computers for field workers. Dell (Dell), for example, in March introduced its first notebook for government and commercial customers looking for a computer that can withstand extreme temperatures and moisture.

The Latitude XFR D630 includes a 14.1-inch LCD screen, but is available with an optional touch screen that supports finger, gloved, or stylus inputs. The system is powered by a 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo T7500 processor, and comes standard with 512 MB of RAM, Windows XP Professional, and a 160 GB hard disk drive. Solid-state drives are also available.

The XFR D630, which is certified by the Department of Defense for extreme field conditions, costs between $2,699 and $4,000, depending on configuration.

Thursday, June 26, 2008

Panasonic Unveils Rugged Ultra-Mobile PC

Panasonic on Wednesday introduced a rugged handheld PC that offers field workers the same features as a full-size notebook, but at a much smaller size.

The CF-U1, the first ultra-mobile PC in the Toughbook product line, is 7 inches wide, 6 inches deep, and 2 inches high. The device has a 5.6-inch touch screen that viewable in sunlight and a Qwerty keyboard. The computer is powered by Intel new low-energy Atom processor and comes with 1 GB of memory.


The computer is the result of more than two years of feedback from an array of government and commercial organizations that need a small computer that can withstand the rigors of being out in the field with insurance adjusters, building inspectors, police officers, firefighters, oil and gas employees, and other workers, the company said. The highly portable device includes a 16 GB solid-state drive, which has no moving parts, making it more durable than hard disk drives.

Data capture options include barcode and RFID readers and a 2-megapixel camera. The computer comes with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth wireless connectivity, with 3G support optional. The machine is available with Windows XP or Windows Vista.

The all-weather CF-U1 is fan-less for quieter operation and includes hot-swappable batteries for replacing power supplies without disrupting operation. Approximate battery life is nine hours. The device, which weights 2.3 pounds, has a magnesium alloy chassis that protects against bumps and drops of up to 4 feet.

The Toughbook CF-U1 is scheduled to be available in Panasonic resellers and distributors in August. Pricing starts at $2,499.

Panasonic is one of many vendors offering rugged computers for field workers. Dell (Dell), for example, in March introduced its first notebook for government and commercial customers looking for a computer that can withstand extreme temperatures and moisture.

The Latitude XFR D630 includes a 14.1-inch LCD screen, but is available with an optional touch screen that supports finger, gloved, or stylus inputs. The system is powered by a 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo T7500 processor, and comes standard with 512 MB of RAM, Windows XP Professional, and a 160 GB hard disk drive. Solid-state drives are also available.

The XFR D630, which is certified by the Department of Defense for extreme field conditions, costs between $2,699 and $4,000, depending on configuration.

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Motorola, Kodak Unveil 5-Megapixel Cameraphone

Motozine ZN5

Kodak and Motorola have teamed up to create a cameraphone that's designed to allow users to easily take and share high-quality photographs.

The Motozine ZN5 is a 5-megapixel candy bar-style phone that features Kodak's Imaging Technology, and it's the first handset in Motorola's Motozine line of multimedia-optimized devices.


"Today's creative consumers not only want to be the photographer, but also the retoucher, the exhibitor, and the critic,"
said Jeremy Dale, Motorola corporate VP of mobile devices marketing, in a statement.
"The Motozine ZN5 lets them be all the things they want to be."

The camera is activated by sliding the Kodak lens open. The device sports an auto-focus feature, Xenon flash, and optimized settings for low-light environments. It also features multiple capture modes, including a panorama mode that automatically stitches together continuous shots into a single extended image.

The cameraphone comes with Kodak's Easy Share Software to organize, edit, store, share, and find mobile pictures. Users can upload photos to a computer via USB, built-in Wi-Fi, or Bluetooth. Photos can also be printed out wirelessly on select Bluetooth-enabled Kodak printers.

To deal with all these photos, the handset comes with 350 MB of internal memory, and the memory can be expanded up to 4 GB via the microSD slot. The cameraphone has a 2.4-inch screen that can switch to landscape mode when shooting photos.

The handset also features CrystalTalk Technology, an MP3 player, an organizer, and a built-in FM radio. It's expected to be available in China in July, with other markets to follow.

The high-end cameraphone market is becoming increasingly crowded. Last week, rival Sony Ericsson launched the latest device in the Cyber-shot line, with an 8.1-megapixel camera.

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Google plans new Internet measurement tool

Google is expected to unveil a tool Tuesday that measures Internet use to help advertisers identify the best places to buy ads that will reach its target audience, according to a report Monday on the Wall Street Journal Web site.

The measurement tools, which will be offered to advertisers and their agencies for free, will compete with services offered by established leaders Nielsen and ComScore. While those services base their estimations on selective surveys or customer panels, Google's results would be based on data collected from Web servers, providing a deeper and broader picture of Internet behavior, the newspaper reported. By giving away the new tool, Google could attract more advertising business.

The news follows Google's announcement last week that Google Trends had unveiled a new service that lets users type in specific domains and compare basic traffic information about any .com site using nothing more than organic user searches. Included are daily traffic numbers in users (sent from Google search), where in the world the users are coming from, and related sites that were either searched for or visited in that same session.

After news of the planned service hit the Web, ComScore shares fell $1.69, or 6.1 percent, to $26 after-hours trading. Nielsen is a privately owned company.

Blogger Huffington Blasts 'Old' Media

New media doesn't entirely reject the model of traditional media, they're just trying to do it better, Arianna Huffington said Monday in front of a crowd at the Personal Democracy Forum Conference in New York City.

That comment followed Huffington's heavy criticism of traditional news organizations for failing to ferret out the truth and instead relying on fake neutrality, which she said they present when they deliver a "he said, she said" piece without consideration for whether those sides have equal value.


She drew applause from the crowd when she said:
"We wasted years debating global warming that way. The world is not flat."

Huffington pointed out that new media aims to increase transparency, accountability, and community. She characterized old media as having the "disorder of attention deficit disorder," while the new media is "obsessive compulsive," which she argues is needed to get to the truth.

She advocated for media with a point of view, but one that doesn't "sell independence for access" or protect those who they favor. She said her site, The Huffington Post, has expanded to become an online newspaper and prides itself on breaking news, just like the old media does.

Huffington also addressed traditional media's criticism of bloggers and citizen journalists as lacking credibility.

"It's not like old media had so much credibility,"

she said.

"We have new media because people didn't trust the old media."

Chuck DeFeo, who fielded questions with Huffington, also expressed confidence in the new media's ability to get the truth out. He said voter apathy, a frequent complaint in the last millennium, has diminished.

"Now we truly have an arena of ideas threaded throughout society,"

he said.

"I don't think there's much apathy today."

DeFeo, VP and general manager of conservative online community Townhall.com, as well several Web sites for Salem Communications' nationally syndicated talk radio programs, said that democratic ideas discussed at the conference have been around since Plato and Voltaire,

"but it's not until now that we are truly able to do it."

DeFeo, who served as e-campaign manager for the Bush-Cheney ticket in 2004, said that the new media has "elevate certain viewpoints that just would not have been heard" before.

Judge sets Facebook hearing status to 'private'

Kicking the public out of a courtroom is an option that should be used rarely and extremely judiciously, which is what makes U.S. District Judge James Ware's decision Monday disappointing.

Ware shuttered the doors to a San Jose, Calif., hearing pitting Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg, probably the world's youngest self-made billionaire, against Harvard University classmates who claim Zuckerberg stole ideas and source code from a similar venture called ConnectU. Ware took this extraordinary step without notice, without a formal request from either side, and without even specifying why it was necessary.

This is at odds with the law of the land--it views courtroom closings as extraordinary events--which is why CNET News.com is evaluating whether to file papers seeking access. Not only should the courtroom not have been closed, but any audio recording or transcript of the proceedings should be released.

It is long-established precedent in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which is binding in San Jose, that two requirements be met before the public can be barred. First, the public and the press must be given

"a reasonable opportunity to state their objections."

Second, the

"reasons supporting closure must be articulated."

Those requirements were conspicuously absent from Monday's hearing. Neither side formally asked Ware to bar the public. When he asked if there were objections -- and representatives of three different news organizations asked the hearing be delayed to give us a reasonable opportunity to raise them--Ware dismissed the idea. He said only that booting out everyone but the lawyers would be "beneficial" (for whom?).

No less an authority than the U.S. Supreme Court described the presumptive First Amendment right to access court proceedings thusly:

"The presumption may be overcome only by an overriding interest based on findings that closure is essential to preserve higher values, and is narrowly tailored to serve that interest. The interest is to be articulated along with findings specific enough that a reviewing court can determine whether the closure order was properly entered."

Ware certainly has experience dealing with complicated technology cases. He showed he was sensitive to civil liberties in his response to the Justice Department's demands to Google. He's presided over spam lawsuits, the RealNetworks case, and the Sex.com lawsuit.

In this case, Facebook got the courtroom closing it wanted, apparently without even having to ask the judge for it. The likely reason for the closure is that ConnectU recently learned of the existence of instant messaging logs from Zuckerberg's computer dating back many years. Facebook attorney Neel Chatterjee of the Orrick law firm has been insistent on keeping these and scores of other documents confidential--the phrase "under seal" now appears no fewer than 234 times in the official court docket.

No doubt Chatterjee is zealously protecting Zuckerberg's interests. But it is unusual for any attorney to claim that so many documents are highly confidential, which prompted ConnectU to request that the judge "limit materials filed under seal." In that and continued public access to proceedings in this case, satisfying the appearance of justice demands no less.

Sunday, June 22, 2008

Pakistani Student Snubs U.S. Ambassador, Payback For Attack


A Pakistani student, Mr. Samad Khurram, today has done what the Pakistani government is afraid to do so far: Snub the U.S. ambassador in the Pakistani capital for the cowardly U.S. attack against our military on the border with Afghanistan.

Samad, a student of law at Harvard University, was in Islamabad to receive a shield of achievement from Anne Patterson, the U.S. ambassador.

But instead of sucking up to the U.S. ambassador, like many Pakistani officials choose to do, Samad had on his mind the blood of over 30 Pakistanis, half of them soldiers, who were killed on the soil of their homeland on June 10 when the Americans sided with Karzai thugs, also known as the 'Afghan national army', and used massive air power to target a peaceful Pakistani border post.

Ms. Patterson was attending a special ceremony organized at the National Arts Gallery by a privately owned Pakistani school. The school had invited 188 of its former students who received scholarships to study at various American colleges and universities. Parents of the students were present, along with Mrs. Zahida Kiayni, the wife of the Chief of Army Staff Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kiyani.

Ms. Patterson and other U.S. embassy officials were shocked and embarrassed when Samad walked to the stage to receive his award but then announced he was refusing the honor to protest the unprovoked American violation of Pakistani airspace and the murder of innocent Pakistanis.

A shaken Ms. Patterson smiled sheepishly and tried to make the best out of an embarrassing moment.

According to the Associated Press of Pakistan, the official news agency, this is how the U.S. ambassador responded:
"The American ambassador, responding to the protest of the student, said America has deep regrets on the incident."
She said
America is proud to have him (Samad Khurram) in USA for study,
adding,
"The only way to remove the misunderstanding is to exchange ideas and views."
Ms. Patterson had a point there. We need to put our position out to the Americans in a clear way. Samad did just that. He did not boycott the ceremony. He attended it and made sure he rebuked the U.S. ambassador in the full glare of the media.

The unfortunate part is that no one present in the huge hall of NCA joined this nationalist young Pakistani in his gesture. At the very least, Pakistanis present in the hall should have given him a standing ovation

The other unfortunate part is that none of the 80 or so Pakistani news channels highlighted the incident. Why did we allow private Pakistani channels in the first place? Wasn't it to project Pakistani position to the world? If this was the Indian media, if this was the Chinese media, if this was the Iranian media, if this was the Arab media, if this was Turkish media, this incident would have been repeated at the top of every news bulletin for the day.

I hope some of the defeatist 'liberal' Pakistanis working for television news channels might be reading this. If you know someone there, please admonish them.

It is sad that ordinary Pakistanis will always be more nationalist and patriotic than their so-called 'liberal' intellectuals and their non-intellectual politicians

But Samad Khurram, no matter what, we are proud of you.

I urge my fellow nationalist Pakistanis to email Samad and congratulate him. His email is samadkhurram@gmail.com